Canned Bluefin Tuna Fish




This is generally the variety of choice for fresh tuna connoisseurs. It has a bit more fat—thus more flavor—than the other varieties. When the bluefin is mature, the flesh is dark red, with an appearance similar to raw beef. This variety is the largest, with the biggest fish recorded as to have grown to about 1,600 pounds.

Standard LID without easy open Most of the bluefin harvest is exported to Japan and sold at a premium price for sashimi.

 

Cooking With Tuna

Everybody knows about the tried-and-true tuna salad, tuna melts, and tuna casserole. But there are so many other ways to cook tuna, including salad Nicoise (a composed salad of tuna, olives, green beans, potatoes, and hard-boiled eggs with a delicious anchovy dressing), seared ahi tuna steaks, and spicy tuna sushi burgers. If using raw tuna steaks, it is important that you don’t overcook—the fish tastes best when rare in the center (but of course, cook to your liking). If looking to make something out of the ordinary with canned tuna, consider deviled eggs with tuna, tuna risotto, or stuffed peppers with tuna.


Specifications

Packaging Can Packed
Freezing Process Cold Storage
Ingredients Tuna Meat, Water, Salt, Oil.
Standard for Tuna in Oil 60% Oil + 40% Brine (water and Salt)
Standard Oil Used Soya Bean Oil (sunflower and Olive Oil Versions Available)
Max Flakes Allowance 30% for Tuna Chunks, 10% for Tuna Solid Pack


These are Are all Our Sizes and Types Available

WHITE MEAT
TUNA (Tongol)
Net/Dried
Weight (grams)
Cans per
carton
Type of
opening
Cartons per
1×20 ft. Fcl.
Chunks in Vegetable Oil 185/130g 48 EOE 1850
Chunks in Vegetable Oil 170/120g 48 EOE 1850
Chunks in Vegetable Oil 160/112g 48 EOE 2000
Chunks in Vegetable Oil 140/98g 48 EOE 2100



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